Public Relations Management Articles List

11 Articles Found

Oregon Communicators Learn About Fundamentals of Crisis Communications DPK Public Relations Founder Daniel Keeney, APR was proud to present at the Spring Conference of the Healthcare Communicators of Oregon last week on the subject of Crisis Communications Planning. He discussed how all crises have certain characteristics, including unwanted scrutiny, an interruption of normal business operations and harm (or threat of harm) to reputation. If your organization is experiencing an event or percolating issue with those three characteristics, you are probably in great danger of being in crisis.  If your organization is in crisis, call DPK Public Relations at 800.596.8708.  Another common element of crisis is that the event could have been anticipated. One of the great values of crisis planning is conducting a threat or vulnerability assessment. We do this by talking with people from throughout the organization and also assessing ...

I am a big fan of Warren Buffett (my Aunt Margie -- maiden name Margie Lee Canaday -- was his classmate in Omaha and was even mentioned in his autobiography, Snowball), so I carved out some time this week to watch his town hall event with Bill Gates at Columbia Business School students on CNBC. Now, it is one thing for me to try to explain to executives the value of our Media Interview Skills Training and Presentation Skills Training services, but to have Warren Buffett put it into dollars and cents -- that takes it to another level!   So when Mr. Buffett explained that improving communications skills can increase the future earnings potential of executives by 50 percent -- which conservatively translates into about a half million dollars for the average college graduate -- it was music to my ears! You could improve on that (he's referring to ...

DPK Public Relations President and Founder Dan Keeney, APR was featured in the article, "Crisis Communications: How to Recover from a Black Eye," in the March/April issue of Perspectives, a publication for the insurance brokerage industry. The article was written by Paula L. Weis, who does a great job of gathering a lot of solid information and delivering it in a way that is interesting and easy to read.    Of course, these are challenging times for the entire financial services industry and insurance brokers are dealing with customers every day who are afraid that their carriers will not be able to survive. But the tips provided regarding crisis planning, response and recovery should be in the pocket of every communicator these days. You never know when you might need it.   Download the article by clicking on the image below.   ...

The audacious lifestyle and otherworldly compensation of the CEO of Blackstone Group is prompting a fair amount of criticism and scrutiny. DPK Public Relations'' President, Dan Keeney, was interview for the following story from Reuters about the backlash: Blackstone CEO''s high profile sparks backlashNEW YORK (Reuters) - If private equity firms had aimed to steer clear of political controversy heading into an election year, the message may have been lost on Stephen Schwarzman. The CEO and co-founder of Blackstone Group this week became a lightning rod for criticism over perceptions that he makes too much money and leads an overly lavish lifestyle. Blackstone revealed his stake in the firm could be worth $7.73 billion after its initial public offering this month and that he will get a one-off payout of up to $677.2 million. One of his private staff also exposed ...

Below is a description of the fundamental elements of crisis communications. If you believe this can be improved, we invite you to comment on it by posting your thoughts below. Crisis communications at its most basic level consists of three elements: crisis planning, crisis response and crisis recovery. Crisis planning is the work done to define what constitutes a crisis for the organization, identify vulnerabilities -- both likely and less-than-likely, assign responsibilities, prepare a spokesperson with media training, practice periodically and prepare standby materials as appropriate. I've seen organizations spend tens of thousands of dollars on the development of a crisis communications plan the size of a phone book and I've seen others create a perfectly functional crisis plan on the back and front a business card. The important thing is the thinking that goes into the process and the commitment to ...