Public Relations Management Articles List

166 Articles Found

Lessons from Our First Decade Training America's Spokespersons During our first 10 years, DPK Public Relations has been honored to train more than 1,000 spokespersons for organizations throughout Texas and across the United States. We have conducted training in top secret military installations and highly volatile chemical facilities. We have conducted one-on-one training for individuals shortly before major media opportunities and for large groups that were unlikely to ever be interviewed -- but who rightly embraced the training 'just in case.' Through it all, one thing has remained true: how you deliver information is just as important as what you say -- and research suggests how information is delivered can easily amplify the power of the information, or it can suck all the power out of it. The goal is to project confidence and positivity to reinforce that you are ...

As I watched Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke’s news conference this afternoon, I was reminded of a story that I often use as an anecdote in media training sessions. Since Mr. Bernanke is winding down his time with the Fed, I wanted to revisit the subject that I originally discussed in the article, "Media Training Fundamental: Reporters Are Always Working." The key point of the upcoming story is that journalists never turn off their nose for news. There is no 'drink in hand' rule that states a journalist who is relaxing isn't also subtly gathering information. A journalist is never idle. They are always curious. Sniffing out interesting information is what they do and who they are. They don’t punch a clock and turn it off. Ever. So when an executive encounters a journalist, that executive should similarly always be in ...

DPK Public Relations is proud to work closely with Lockheed Martin in support of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program in recent years and we enjoy spreading the word about the jaw dropping capabilities of the plane, which is being built in Fort Worth, Texas. We have helped people throughout the organization -- including test pilots, business development executives and manufacturing leaders -- prepare for all types of interactions. While the program has faced some scrutiny, the feedback from the most important community -- the pilots -- has been universally enthusiastic. This terrific first-person account from British Squadron Leader Frankie Buckler is a great example of why it benefits organizations to have people who can communicate complex information in ways that are easy to understand ready at all times to speak.   Con Coughlin, The Telegraph's defense editor, accompanied a ...

The summer 2012 launch of client Saint Arnold Brewing Company's Divine Reserve No. 12 took on a life of its own, with news organizations competing for the inside scoop and tracking down brewers on their way to the grocery store and at the brewery late at night. Here is the story from Houston's KHOU Channel 11: The Saint Arnold example provides a few lessons for any organization seeking positive media coverage: 1. Think long-term. DPK Public Relations has been working with Saint Arnold for eight years and keeps information flowing regularly to the newsrooms. 2. Don't get discouraged. We have had plenty of instances where we felt we had a great story only to be disappointed that nobody jumped on it. Instead of getting discouraged, we trusted that our good ideas weren't being ignored and they would eventually generate coverage. ...

This week's launch of Divine Reserve No. 12, the latest small batch beer from our client, Saint Arnold Brewing, offers some important PR lessons. The biggest lesson is to keep doing what you do and people will notice. Saint Arnold Divine Reserve was originally imagined as a very high quality limited supply beer. It was among the first beers that was a one-off recipe. Once it is gone, the recipe is retired (although two have been un-retired to join the brewery's regular line-up of year-round and seasonal offerings). By sticking with the limited supply concept, Saint Arnold has been the beneficiary of considerable excitement as craft beer fans -- in growing numbers -- turn out to get their's. Considerable excitement tends to be pretty visible and noisey (especially online), which gets the attention of the media. Anticipating the story was going ...

  With roots and many friends in Colorado, DPK Public Relations' President Dan Keeney was deeply effected by this month's tragic shooting that killed or injured dozens of men, women and children. As a graduate of the University of Colorado, Keeney has kept a close eye on developments to understand what role, if any, the University may have played in triggering the gunman. Our thoughts and best wishes go out to the victims and their families. As experts in crisis communication that help organizations plan for and respond to problems and crisis events, DPK Public Relations regularly is called upon by journalists to offer expert advice and guidance. As FOX News reported: Warner Bros. to contribute to Aurora relief fund; PR pros say studio handling crisis with care and compassion Daniel Keeney, President of DPK Public Relations and PR crisis ...

DPK Public Relations is proud of its long-term relationship with NASA and we extend our sincere congratulations on the milestone achieved this month: the delivery of the first space-bound Orion spacecraft, which is designed to advance human space exploration further from Earth than any mission in 40 years. Orion is an affordable solution for multiple mission capability that builds upon the technology innovations and spacecraft development the NASA-industry team has accomplished.

We recently returned from conducting a couple days of Media Interview Skills Training on the West Coast for one of our aerospace clients and wanted to share some insights that were discussed. One thing we've noticed during the past couple years is a tendency particularly among younger women to inflect up at the end of their sentences. They say powerful things but end them on the upswing. It makes every sentence sound like a question. It saps them of credibility and authority, making them appear eternally uncertain.  I love meaningful voice inflection. As a young broadcaster, I loved watching Bill Kurtis on the local CBS affiliate in Chicago. He was a master of using pacing and inflection to build drama and pull a viewer into a story. But if your inflection goes up? At the end of every phrase? It ...

  Barry Shlachter with the Fort Worth Star-Telegram recently reported on the story of the owner of a new brew pub who let his frustrations with his kitchen staff get the better of him. We've all heard the classic advice to count to 10 or go walk it off so you don't do or say something you will later regret. Apparently this guy didn't get that advice. As Shlachter describes in his story, "Fort Worth pub seeks to put profane posts in the past," which was picked up by other papers who use the Mclatchy-Tribune News Service, Carlo Galotto ranted publicly via Facebook about what he called, "spoiled Obama kids" then engaged in some name calling when people posted responses to his unfortunate tirade. Not exactly a great way to ingratiate yourself or your brand new business to your community. ...

  Earlier this week, I attended the Houston Business Journal's Fast Tech 50 Technology Conference. It was a little work and pleasure mix, since DPK Public Relations had three clients among the 50 companies being recognized (congratulations to Alert Logic, DiCentral and Schipul - the Web Marketing Company). The best part of the day was the opening session, which featured notable CEOs and former CEOs who had built companies that have experienced rapid growth. Our client Alert Logic was represented by CEO Gray Hall. They've been among the fastest growing tech companies in Houston for six straight years, which is an amazing accomplishment. Others on panel included CEOs from Blinds.com, The Planet, Rackspace and SmartVault. Russ Capper served as moderator. Great stuff. The first part of the session is posted below: While I wish the lighting was better, the content here ...